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approved by Co Op Bank

Ready to buy a new home? Failing to check that a lawyer is on the Co Op Bank list of approved solicitors can put your transaction at risk of delay or failure.

Find an Approved Solicitor on the Co operative Bank plc Conveyancing Panel

Frequently asked questions relating to the Co operative Bank Conveyancing Panel

My Conveyancer is not listed on the Co operative Bank Conveyancing Panel. Can I still continue with my preferred solicitor even though they are excluded from the Co operative Bank panel?
The most common options here are as follows:
  1. Carry on with your preferred solicitors but Co operative Bank will need to instruct a lawyer on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel. This will result in additional cost and potential delay.
  2. Get a new solicitor to act in the purchase, obviously checking they are on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel.
  3. Convince your lawyer to do everything within their powers to join the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel
My conveyancer has requested from me proof of ID documents stating that this is part of his retainer as a solicitor on the Co operative Bank Solicitor panel. This is news to me - can I refuse?
Due to Money Laundering Regulations your conveyancing lawyer is duty bound to confirm positively your identification when entering into a business relationship with you. It is a criminal offense if your lawyer not do this. If you do not provide ID early in the transaction the solicitor must refuse to act for you. It’s unlikely a lawyer will turn you away if you come to the first meeting without relevant ID but you will have to produce it at some point so you might as well bring it with you to the initial meeting so the lawyer can tick the ID verification box and start sorting out the conveyancing straight away. If you are getting a mortgage with Co operative Bank your lawyer also has to check ID documents to satisfy Co operative Bank
I am looking for online conveyancing estimates. Can I be sure that all the practices that are identified on your directory are on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel?
The law firms listed on our site have advised us that they are on the Co operative Bank panel and agreed to advise us to take down their listing in the event of removal off of the Co operative Bank panel. To date we have not been informed by either a lender or a member of the public that the data about a specific firm being on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel is not accurate.
My grandfather passed away last year and as sole heir and executor was left the property. The house had a small mortgage left on it of around £8000. I want to transfer the title deeds into my name whilst I re-mortgage to Co operative Bank , pay off the mortgage etc. Is this possible?
If you intend to re-mortgage then Co operative Bank will insist on your using a conveyancer on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel. Here is link to the Land Registry online guidance around what to do when a property owner dies. This will help you to understand the registration process behind changing the details re the registered title. in your case it would appear that you are effectively purchasing the property from the estate. Your Co operative Bank conveyancing panel solicitor pays the new mortgage money into the estate, the estate pays off the old mortgage, the charge is released and you become the owner and the Co operative Bank mortgage is registered as a charge at the Land Registry.
For 5 years I had a mortgage with Co operative Bank. My godfather has just retired and wants to pay off the mortgage left on the property. After Co operative Bank is paid, I want to transfer the property to my mother's name; How long will it roughly take? Do we need two separate solicitors on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel? I do not intend to live at the property once the Co operative Bank mortgage is discharged.
Although you do need to retain the services of a lawyer they dont need to be on the Co operative Bank panel. You will need a solicitor to draw up the transfer and to deal with the Land Registry formalities. The only thing you need to consider is that by selling at an undervalue so ask your lawyer about the implications. There could be an inheritance tax issue if you die within 7 years of this. There's no capital gains tax for you as it is your main residence.
I have instructed a lawyer having checked that they are on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel. Does my lawyer arrange the survey of the property? Or I've digested plenty of house buying,I note that they all recommend that you should get your house surveyed prior to buying it. When I asked my solicitor - who is on the Co operative Bank conveyancing panel - on this she said they don't do this and I need to contract an independent surveyor. is that correct?
Co operative Bank will need an independent valuation of the property. Your lawyer will not arrange this. Usually Co operative Bank will appoint their own surveyor to do this, and you will have to pay for it. Remember that this is a valuation for mortgage purposes and not a survey. You may wish to consider appointing your own surveyor to carry out a survey or prepare a home buyers report on the property. It is up to you to satisfy yourself that the property is structurally sound before you buy it. If the survey or report reveals that building work is needed, you should tell your solicitor. You may wish to renegotiate with the seller. or Your lawyer will not organise the survey but they may be able to put you in touch with a local one that they recommend. RICS offers a find a surveyor service (just google it) where you can search for a qualified surveyor by postcode. As you are getting a mortgage with Co operative Bank you could contact your them to see if they have a list of approved surveyors.
Co operative Bank have agreed my mortgage in principle, my offer on house has been accepted, now what?
The estate agent will want to know who your solicitors are (make sure these solicitors are on the lenders panel). Call up Co operative Bank or your broker and complete any relevant paperwork. Co operative Bank will tell you what documents they want. Co operative Bank will instruct a valuer. The valuer will get in touch with the estate agent or seller to book an appointment. Once conducted (assuming no problems) it takes about week to get a mortgage offer. Co operative Bank will issue the offer to you and your lawyer. The transaction will then take it’s course according the nature and complexity of the conveyancing.